[6 min read] Managing pelvic organ prolapse in primary care

pelvic organ prolapse

Pelvic organ prolapse (POP) occurs when the pelvic organs (i.e. the bladder, vagina, cervix, uterus and rectum) protrude downwards into the vaginal canal due to weakening of the pelvic floor and loss of anatomical support. POP is more common in older women, women who have had a vaginal delivery, and women who are overweight or obese.

It is essential for primary care practitioners to be able to support these patients in general practice.
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[6 min read] Managing urinary incontinence in primary care

incontinence

Urinary incontinence affects an estimated 38 per cent of Australian women, and it is estimated that up to 70 per cent of sufferers do not consult with a healthcare professional, possibly due to embarrassment. Therefore general practitioners need to ask about urinary incontinence in a sensitive manner.
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[5 min read] Supporting post-menopausal women in primary care

post-menopausal women

Most women reach menopause between the ages of 45 and 60, with the average age being 51. Menopause is the permanent cessation of menstrual bleeding caused by loss of ovarian follicular activity, and can be diagnosed clinically in women over the age of 45 who have not had a menstrual period for 12 months. Menopausal symptoms can persist for many years after the point of menopause, and are a common reason for consulting a primary care practitioner.
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[5 min read] Women’s obesity & weight management in primary care

women's obesity

Weight management is relevant to everyone, and problems with weight management, although not a common presenting complaint, are often first unearthed by the general practitioner. With 60 per cent of Australian women being overweight or obese, and this proportion expected to increase, weight management is relevant to a large proportion of people attending their GP. Continue reading “[5 min read] Women’s obesity & weight management in primary care”

[5 min read] Managing breast problems in primary care

breast problems

Breast problems are a common reason for women to attend their general practitioner. These problems can cause significant anxiety, primarily because breast cancer is the most common malignancy in the population, affecting nearly one in eight women. Some of the most common presentations are breast lumps, mastalgia (pain in the breast), nipple problems and skin changes. Continue reading “[5 min read] Managing breast problems in primary care”

[5 min read] Managing pregnancy complications in primary care

pregnancy complications

The vast majority of pregnancies progress without any complications. Many minor problems and complications are managed by the general practitioner; however, it is essential to know when referral to secondary care is warranted.
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[4 min read] Managing women’s fertility in primary care

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fertility

The general practitioner is likely to be the first port of call for a woman with questions or worries about her fertility. It is important to be confident in providing initial advice and guidance regarding fertility, and to know when further investigations or referral to secondary care is warranted. Continue reading “[4 min read] Managing women’s fertility in primary care”

[5 min read] Managing women’s sexual health in primary care

women's sexual health

Women often feel more comfortable approaching their primary care practitioner for their sexual health needs than visiting a sexual health clinic, so the general practitioner must be comfortable discussing sexual health.
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[5 min read] How to manage pelvic pain in primary care

pelvic pain

Pelvic pain is a common presentation in women and can be acute or chronic. Acute pelvic pain is typically described as less than three months in duration, whereas chronic pelvic pain is usually described as lasting over six months. Continue reading “[5 min read] How to manage pelvic pain in primary care”

[5 min read] Family planning in primary care

family planning

Family planning is a common reason for attendance at primary care and affects most women at some stage in their life. Good family planning provision is essential for both maternal and child health and involves not only the prevention of pregnancy but ensuring good reproductive health overall, including pre-conception advice. Continue reading “[5 min read] Family planning in primary care”