[6 min read] How time spent applying sunscreen affects your patients’ skin

sunscreen

Sunscreen is a vital part of everyday skin care for Australians. The nation has the world’s highest rate of skin cancer, with around 800,000 diagnoses every year, and the vast majority of these skin cancers are caused by unprotected exposure to the sun’s UV radiation. UV is also responsible for premature ageing of the skin, resulting in wrinkles, lines, unwanted pigmentation, sun spots, and loss of skin elasticity. Continue reading “[6 min read] How time spent applying sunscreen affects your patients’ skin”

[4 min read] Do you know the symptoms of pregnancy dermatoses?

pregnancy dermatoses

Do you know how to recognise symptoms of pregnancy dermatoses? The specific dermatoses of pregnancy are a rare group of skin diseases specifically related to pregnancy.

During pregnancy, every organ is adapting in order to accept another human body. The main changes occur in the endocrine, immune, metabolic, and vascular systems. The skin is no exception. Many skin changes during pregnancy are considered to be normal or physiological, including striae gravidarum or melasma. Continue reading “[4 min read] Do you know the symptoms of pregnancy dermatoses?”

[5 min read] 6 myths your patients may believe about the diet-skin link

myths

Skin-related concerns make up 11.5 per cent of GP consultations. Many patients believe popular myths about skincare, especially in relation to how their diet can affect their skin. These patients often follow home remedies that do little to solve their skin problems, and it is sometimes the GP’s role to intervene and debunk patients’ misconceptions. Here are six widespread beliefs about the diet-skin link. Continue reading “[5 min read] 6 myths your patients may believe about the diet-skin link”

[4 min read] Tea tree oil for actinic keratosis

actinic keratosis

Actinic keratosis is a scaly, red, and occasionally itchy patch of skin that sometimes resembles a mole. These lesions usually appear on patients over 50 years of age but can also manifest in younger adults, especially those with prolonged sun exposure. Patients often have many lesions at one time.

Often referred to as sunspots, or solar keratosis, there is a risk that these lesions will develop into squamous cell carcinomas or melanomas, but the exact risk is unknown and it can’t be predicted which ones will progress. Therefore, early treatment is the best option.

Continue reading “[4 min read] Tea tree oil for actinic keratosis”

[8 min read] Rosacea: Pathophysiology and presentation

rosacea

Rosacea affects around 415 million people worldwide, and is particularly common in women over 30. As a primary care physician, how much do you know about the pathophysiology and presentation of this skin condition? Continue reading “[8 min read] Rosacea: Pathophysiology and presentation”

[6 min read] Are smartphones bad for your patients’ skin?

smartphones

Are smartphones bad for your patients’ skin? There has been past discussion on the negative effect of mobile phones’ blue light on the epidermis, but now there may be further evidence that mobile phones contribute to common skin conditions such as acne, dermatitis, wrinkles and pigmentation. So what can you do to help your patients with these concerns? Continue reading “[6 min read] Are smartphones bad for your patients’ skin?”

[3 min read] Sunscreen use optimised by two consecutive applications

sunscreen

Australians are often inadequately protected from the sun. People can become sunburned from just 10 minutes of sun exposure which heightens their risk of skin cancer and can cause irreversible damage to skin cells, resulting in skin pigmentation issues, moles and freckles, loss of skin elasticity, wrinkles and fine lines.
Continue reading “[3 min read] Sunscreen use optimised by two consecutive applications”

[3 min read] Update on treatments and prognosis of dermatomyositis

Dermatomyositis

Dermatomyositis is an autoimmune disease affecting both skin and muscle. Oral steroids are the first-line treatment, but no consensus exists regarding dosing, length of treatment, tapering speed, or when to add which immunosuppressant in case of steroid resistance. Continue reading “[3 min read] Update on treatments and prognosis of dermatomyositis”

[3 min read] Tofacitinib for chronic plaque psoriasis

tofacitinib psoriasis

For patients with moderate to severe chronic plaque psoriasis, what is the long-term safety and durability of efficacy of tofacitinib? Continue reading “[3 min read] Tofacitinib for chronic plaque psoriasis”

[3 min read] Psoralen-ultraviolet A for hand eczema treatment

hand eczema

Can hand eczema be effectively treated with psoralen-ultraviolet A? Hand eczema is a common inflammatory dermatosis that causes significant patient morbidity. Studies comparing psoralen–ultraviolet A with narrowband ultraviolet B have been small, non-randomised and retrospective.

Continue reading “[3 min read] Psoralen-ultraviolet A for hand eczema treatment”