[5 min watch] Should you wear a face mask to protect against coronavirus?

Should you or your patients wear a face mask to protect against coronavirus? Epidemiologist and public health medicine specialist Professor David Wilkinson provides expert advice in this short video, along with a demonstration from the WHO on how to correctly wear masks.

Watch the short video here:

Watch the latest coronavirus update for GPs from Professor David Wilkinson here.

7 comments on “[5 min watch] Should you wear a face mask to protect against coronavirus?

  1. That wa suseful I realized that I have been doing a few things wrong…Touching the mask with my hands, re using the same mask. Further, I have not been removing the mask in the recommended manner.
    Thank you.

  2. I disagree with this position statement of the WHO. The logic is flawed.
    Studies are showing asymptomatic spread of COVID-19. In countries/cities with community spread, we have to assume that any patient could potentially be spreading the virus. I wear a mask in the clinic for all patient interactions and will ask patients to wear a home made mask or surgical mask if available for all interactions.
    Patients can be educated on proper donning and doffing procedures. Hand hygiene will continue.

    1. Agree Darshini. The assumption is that we can correctly “guess” who are infected. And we can not (not with a suggested asymptomatic rate of 50%.) Thus rather assume any and all infected, and everyone taking precaution by wearing a face covering or surgical mask if available

    2. well, it depends on your setting. in settings where there are no / very few cases, there is less value in using a mask. In settings where prevalence, and transition is high, wearing a mask makes more sense. The key is to use the mask properly, and to not stop other precautions. We don’t yet know how infectious asymptomatic people are – we just don’t know. We can reasonably assume that symptomatic people are more infectious. We also can reasonably assume that transmission requires ‘prolonged’ and ‘close’ contact. As we all know, all of this speaks to risk-benefit. Young (<70y) and otherwise well people usually have a non-serious illness with COVID; older and sicker people are much more likely to have a serious illness that is (at times) life-threatening. So, I think it depends what you are doing, who you are, and where you are

  3. Agree Darshini. The assumption is that we can correctly “guess” who are infected. And we can not (not with a suggested asymptomatic rate of 50%.) Thus rather assume any and all infected, and everyone taking precaution by wearing a face covering or surgical mask if available

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